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Performing a typical Exchange Server 2010 install

10/4/2011 4:39:46 PM
When performing a typical server install, the account that's used for the installation process needs to be a member of the Schema Administrators group in Active Directory, as well as a member of the Enterprise Administrators. This is true for an upgrade as well as a completely new installation.

To install Exchange Server 2010, just follow these steps:

  1. Log on to the server on which you want to install Exchange Server 2010.

  2. Navigate to the installation (DVD, local directory or a network share) and double-click the setup.exe program. This will start the setup splash-screen.

    Figure 1. The setup application welcome screen.
  3. If you haven't already installed the Exchange Server 2010 prerequisites, the setup program offers the possibility to install them using the menu.

    1. Install Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5

    2. Install Windows PowerShell V2.

  4. You have to select the Language Options for Exchange Server 2010. You can download all Language files from the Language Bundle (locally stored or on the Internet) or continue with the Language that's on your DVD. If you select this option, only the default language will be used. Not only for the setup application, but also, for example, for the Outlook Web App.

  5. When all prerequisite software is installed you can select "Step 4: Install Microsoft Exchange."

  6. On the Introduction and Confirmation Pages you can just click Next after you've read the messages.

  7. You'll need to "accept the terms in the license agreement" – select the appropriate radio button and click Next.

  8. Depending on your company policy, select whether or not you want to enable the Error Reporting feature and click Next to continue.

  9. The next page asks for the Installation Type. You can select a typical Exchange Server installation, where the Hub Transport Server role, Client Access Server role, Mailbox Server role and the Exchange Management Tools are all installed on the same server. The second option is a custom Exchange Server installation, where you can select which individual roles to install.

  10. Select the Typical Exchange Server Installation and click Next to continue.

  11. Since this is a fresh installation, an Exchange organization doesn't exist yet, so you'll need to enter a name for the Exchange Server organization. The default name is "First Organization," but any name can be used as long as these are the only characters used:

    • A through Z

    • a through z

    • 0 through 9

    • Space (not leading or trailing)

    • Hyphen or dash.

Figure 2. Select a Typical or a Custom Exchange Server installation.

Click Next once you've entered a valid organization name.

  1. The next window is the Client Settings window, and this is very important. Your selection needs to be based on the email clients used in your organization. Outlook 2003 or earlier and Entourage clients depend on Public Folders for Free/Busy information (i.e. calendaring) and Offline Address Book downloads. On the other hand, Outlook 2007 and Outlook 2010 can both use the Availability Services and Web-based Offline Address Book Download features in Exchange Server 2007 and later. If you do not install Public Folders at this time, it's always possible to install Public Folders later to support Outlook 2003 or Entourage clients in your Exchange environment. Click Next to continue.

    Figure 3. The client settings are dependent on the type of clients used in your organization.
  2. A new aspect of the Exchange Server 2010 setup process is the option to enter the external domain name. If you do enter an external domain name, the Exchange Server 2010 Client Access Server role will be configured smoothly and automatically with the appropriate settings. If you do not enter an external domain name during the setup, you'll have to configure the settings manually after the setup has finished.

  3. Depending on your company policy, you can choose whether or not to join the Exchange Customer Experience Improvement Program, and then click Next.

    Figure 4. Enter the External Domain Name for automatically configuring the Client Access Server.
  4. The next step is the Readiness Check. The setup program will run a final check on the server's readiness for the Exchange organization, the language packs and the server roles. If any prerequisite is missing, it's displayed here and you'll have the option to correct the issues. If all the checks come back OK, you can finally click that inviting "Install" button.

  5. During the installation, the progress is shown for each part of the process. This whole affair can take a considerable amount of time, depending on the hardware being used for the Exchange Server, so you'll need to be patient. Once the setup program is finished you'll have the option to view the setup log, just in case of problems (which, if you've followed these steps, there shouldn't be). When you click on "Finish," the setup program is done, and the Exchange Management Console is opened to finalize the new Exchange server.

    Figure 5. When the setup program is finished it can be finalized using the Exchange Management Console.
 
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