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Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Prepare for Delivery - Adapting Presentations for Different Audiences

11/19/2011 11:23:54 AM
If you plan to deliver variations of the same presentation to different audiences, you should prepare one presentation containing all the slides you are likely to need for all the audiences. Then you can select slides from the presentation that are appropriate for a particular audience and group them as a custom slide show. When you need to deliver the presentation for that audience, you open the main presentation and show the subset of slides by choosing the custom slide show from a list.

For example, suppose you need to pitch an idea for a new product or service to both a team of project managers and a company’s executive team. Many of the slides would be the same for both groups, but the presentation to the executive team would include more in-depth competitive and financial analysis. You would develop the executive team’s presentation first and then create a custom slide show for the project managers by using a subset of the slides in the executive presentation.

During a presentation, you might sometimes want to be able to make an on-the-spot decision about whether to display a particular slide. You can give yourself this flexibility by hiding the slide so that you can skip over it if its information doesn’t seem useful to a particular audience. If you decide to include the slide’s information in the presentation, you can display it by pressing the letter H or by using the Go To Slide command.

In this exercise, you’ll select slides from an existing presentation to create a custom slide show for a different audience. You’ll also hide a slide and then see how to display it when necessary.



  1. On the Slide Show tab, in the Start Slide Show group, click the Custom Slide Show button, and then click Custom Shows.

    The Custom Shows dialog box opens.

  2. Click New.

    The Define Custom Show dialog box opens.

    The default custom show name is selected in the Slide Show Name box.

  3. In the Slide show name box, type Managers.

  4. In the Slides in presentation list, click slide 1, and then click Add.

    Slide 1 appears as Slide 1 in the Slides In Custom Show box on the right.

  5. In the Slides in presentation list, click slide 2, hold down the Shift key, and click slide 6. Then click Add.

    The slides appear in sequential order in the Slides In Custom Show box on the right.

    You can change the order of the slides by clicking the Up or Down arrow to the right of the Slides In Custom Show box.

  6. Add slides 9, 10, and 14 through 16, and then click OK.

    Of the 16 slides in the presentation, you have chosen 11 to show to managers.

  7. In the Custom Shows dialog box, click Show to start the custom slide show.

  8. Click the mouse button to advance through all the slides, including the blank one at the end of the show.

  9. In Normal view, on the Slide Show tab, in the Start Slide Show group, click the Custom Slide Show button.

    The Managers custom show has been added to the list. Clicking this option will run the custom slide show.

  10. In the list, click Custom Shows.

  11. In the Custom Shows dialog box, verify that Managers is selected, and then click Edit.

    The Define Custom Show dialog box opens.

  12. In the Slides in custom show list, click slide 3, and then click Remove.

    PowerPoint removes the slide from the custom slide show, but not from the main presentation.

  13. Click OK to close the Define Custom Show dialog box, and then click Close to close the Custom Shows dialog box.

  14. On the Slides tab of the Overview pane, click slide 3, and then in the Set Up group, click the Hide Slide button.

    On the Slides tab, PowerPoint puts a box with a diagonal line around the number 3, and dims the slide contents to indicate that it is hidden.

    Slide 3 is hidden.


    Tip:

    Tip

    You can also right-click the slide thumbnail and then click Hide Slide.


  15. Display slide 2, and switch to Reading view. Then click the Next button.

    Because slide 3 is hidden, PowerPoint skips from slide 2 to slide 4.

  16. Click the Previous button to move back to slide 2.

  17. Right-click anywhere on the screen, point to Go to Slide, and then click (3) Process.

    The number is in parentheses because the slide is hidden. When you click it, the hidden slide appears in Reading view.

  18. Press Esc to return to Normal view.


Note:

Save the ServiceShows presentation, and then close it.

 
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