Applications Server
 
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Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Outlook Web Access
Outlook Web Access (OWA) provides the interface for users to access their mail across the Internet utilizing a web browser. With the implementation of OWA 2003, Microsoft improved the features and performance of the product until it was almost as powerful as the actual Microsoft Outlook client.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Protecting Against Spam (part 2) - Filtering Junk Mail
Both Outlook 2003 and Outlook 2007 allow users to create and manage their own Safe Senders and Blocked Senders. As the name implies, the Safe Senders list is made up of user-defined addresses or domains, and messages from these addresses or domains will never be treated as junk email.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Protecting Against Spam (part 2) - Filtering Junk Mail
This feature has been improved with each new revision and is useful in minimizing the need for end users to configure junk mail filtering options. In fact, junk mail filtering is primarily controlled by Exchange administrators. However, some options can be configured by the users.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Protecting Against Spam (part 1) - Protecting Against Web Beaconing
A common and very popular format for email messages is Hypertext Markup Language, or HTML. This format is so popular because of the rich content that can be presented, including graphics, images, font formatting, and more
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Outlook 2007 (part 2) - Encrypting Communications Between Outlook and Exchange , Blocking Attachments
A common and often effective way for viruses and malicious scripts to spread from user to user is through email. When a user receives a message with an attachment, simply opening the attachment can allow the virus to activate and, if proper security measures are not in place, the virus can do damage to the system or spread to other users.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Outlook 2007 (part 1) - Outlook Anywhere
Prior to Exchange Server 2003, Outlook users who needed to connect to Exchange over the Internet had to establish a virtual private network (VPN) connection prior to using Outlook.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Your Windows Environment (part 3) - Keeping Up with Security Patches and Updates
With Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, and Windows XP, utilities exist that allow you to automate this process and simplify the distribution of updates. Microsoft has provided several options: Windows Update, Microsoft Update, Microsoft Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), and Microsoft Systems Management Server (SMS)
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Your Windows Environment (part 2) - Utilizing Security Templates
Security templates are a practical and effective means to apply standardized security policies and configurations to multiple systems in an environment.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Your Windows Environment (part 1) - Windows Server 2003 Security Improvements , Windows Vista Security Improvements
Windows Vista complements Windows Server 2003 from the client perspective by supporting the security features embedded in Windows Server 2003.
Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Client-Level Secured Messaging - Exchange Server 2007 Client-Level Security Enhancements
As mentioned earlier, Exchange Server 2007 has several improved security features—especially when combined with Outlook 2007.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Requirements : Additional Requirements
In addition to making sure that the hardware and server software can support Exchange Server 2010, there are a few infrastructure requirements that you need to consider.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Requirements : Software Requirements (part 2) - Windows Server Roles and Features
Windows Server 2008 breaks down the additional Windows components into roles and features. Depending on the Exchange 2010 roles, Windows Server 2008 will require additional Windows Server roles and features to be installed.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Requirements : Software Requirements (part 1) - Additional Software
There are a few additional pieces of software that you will need to ensure are installed on Windows Server 2008 SP2 or R2 in addition to Exchange Server 2010:
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Requirements : Getting the Right Server Hardware (part 3) - Disk Requirements
When calculating disk requirements for some applications, it is easy to decide that a single 500 GB hard disk will solve your storage needs. You might be tempted to think the same thing about Exchange Server.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Requirements : Getting the Right Server Hardware (part 2) - Memory Recommendations, Network Requirements
As mentioned previously, the advantage that Exchange Server gets out of the x64 architecture is the ability to access more physical memory. Additional physical memory improves caching, reduces the disk I/O profile, and allows for the addition of more features.
Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Requirements : Getting the Right Server Hardware (part 1) - The Typical User , CPU Recommendations
Exchange Server 2010 only runs on Windows Server 2008 x64 and therefore only on hardware (physical or virtualized hardware) that is capable of supporting the x64 processor extensions.
Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading Service Applications
In each of these cases the upgrade method is the same. Restore a copy of your SharePoint 2010 database into your SharePoint 2013’s SQL instance and start the service instance.
Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading Site Collections
After restoring your content database in SQL, testing it against your SharePoint 2013 web application, and mounting it in SharePoint, you’re in the home stretch. You’re so close you can almost smell that newly upgraded SharePoint 2013 site collection.
Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading Content (part 4) - Attaching the Content Database
To satisfy your curiosity about what happened during the upgrade, SharePoint 2013 does a thorough job documenting the process. Each time a database is upgraded it creates two log files.
Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading Content (part 3) - Fixing the Issues, Additional Parameters
When you’re looking at the output of Test-SPContentDatabase you should start at the top, because fixing issues there will oftentimes fix issues downstream.
Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading Content (part 2) - Running Test-SPContentDatabase
Now that the databases are restored and configured correctly, you can start testing them to see how nicely they’ll play with SharePoint 2013.
Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading Content - Creating the Web Application, Testing the Content Database
While there are several steps to successfully upgrade content from SharePoint 2010 to SharePoint 2013, the process is relatively straightforward. This section describes the steps necessary to attach a SharePoint 2010 database to a SharePoint 2013 farm and upgrade it.
Sharepoint 2013 : Developing Integrated Apps for Office and Sharepoint Solutions - The New App Model for Office
In this exercise you first created a network share as a trusted catalog location for storing Apps for Office manifest files. This is essentially an easy way for an enterprise to make Apps for Office available to employees, although it is not the only way.
Overview of Oauth in Sharepoint 2013 : Application Authorization - On-Premises App Authentication with S2S
In some situations an organization might need its SharePoint environment and solutions to be purely on-premises. This could be for security reasons, technical reasons such as in disconnected network situations, or simply because on-premises solutions are the company policy.
Overview of Oauth in Sharepoint 2013 : Application Authorization - Requesting Permissions Dynamically
After an application call to a SharePoint API has been authenticated, the next step in the chain of security processing is to check whether the app and user have the appropriate rights to the resources they are attempting to access.
Overview of Oauth in Sharepoint 2013 : Application Authentication (part 2) - Managing Tokens in Your Application
When an application is launched by a user a context token is passed to it. After this has happened it is up to the application to handle the tokens and potentially store them for future use or pass between app pages.
Overview of Oauth in Sharepoint 2013 : Application Authentication (part 1) - Using TokenHelper
Now that you understand what application identities are and how to create and set them up in SharePoint, you can take a look at how those identities are used as part of the authentication between applications and SharePoint.
Overview of Oauth in Sharepoint 2013 : Creating and Managing Application Identities
In the previous section you saw how applications have an identity as well as users. When an app takes an action in the context of a user, SharePoint records this information.
Overview of Oauth in Sharepoint 2013 : Introduction to OAuth
OAuth is an open standard managed by the Internet Engineering Task Force and is designed to allow applications to access services in a Web-friendly manner on behalf of an application or user.
Sharepoint 2013 : Upgrading to Sharepoint 2013 - Upgrade Considerations (part 3) - Don’t Upgrade Crap
The upgrade process in SharePoint has always been very robust, and that continues with SharePoint 2013. However, there are a few things you can do before your upgrade that will make it go more smoothly and quickly. This section provides some guidance on things you can do to prepare for your upgrade to SharePoint 2013
 
 
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- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Outlook Web Access
- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Protecting Against Spam (part 2) - Filtering Junk Mail
- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Protecting Against Spam (part 2) - Filtering Junk Mail
- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Protecting Against Spam (part 1) - Protecting Against Web Beaconing
- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Outlook 2007 (part 2) - Encrypting Communications Between Outlook and Exchange , Blocking Attachments
- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Outlook 2007 (part 1) - Outlook Anywhere
- Securing an Exchange Server 2007 Environment : Securing Your Windows Environment (part 3) - Keeping Up with Security Patches and Updates