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Microsoft Access 2010 : Creating Your Own Databases and Tables - Selecting the Appropriate Field Type for Data
The type of data you need to store in a field has the biggest influence on which data type you select. For example, if you need to store numbers that begin with leading zeros, you can’t select a Number field because leading zeros entered into a Number field are ignored.
Microsoft Access 2010 : Creating Your Own Databases and Tables - Building a New Table (part 2) - Designing a Table from Scratch
Many people believe that designing tables from scratch offers flexibility and encourages good design principles. Although it requires some knowledge of database and table design, it gives you more control and precision than designing a table from datasheet view.
Microsoft Access 2010 : Creating Your Own Databases and Tables - Building a New Table (part 1) - Building a Table from a Datasheet
Adding descriptions to table, query, form, report, macro, and module objects goes a long way toward making an application self-documenting. Such documentation helps you, or anyone who modifies an application, perform any required maintenance on the application’s objects.
Microsoft Access 2010 : Creating Your Own Databases and Tables - Types of Databases Available, Creating a New Database
Access 2010 sports two types of databases: a standard database, and a web database. The standard database is consistent with that of all the previous versions of Access.
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 7) - How Long Will All These Tasks Take?
The next step can be the most difficult part of scheduling. You need to look into your crystal ball and give your best guess—er, informed estimate—of how long each project step should take. You can find entire books on this subject alone.
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 6) - List the people on your project,Assign resources to tasks
Work could still be up for grabs when you create your schedule. Even if you don’t know resource names, you probably know what skills are required to do the work. You can use a person’s name if you have a lucky team member lined up, or fill in generic names when all you know is the type of work or skill required.
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 5) - Creating task dependencies
Most likely, the people who work on your project would revolt if you asked them to do all the tasks at the same time. More importantly, some work simply has to be completed before other work can start.
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 4) - Adding milestones to a project schedule
A milestone typically appears at the end of the tasks that produce the deliverable or achieve a key point in progress. Completing a milestone is like crossing off an item on your
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 3) - Listing project tasks
The foundation for any schedule is the work that will achieve the project’s objectives and deliver the desired results. Before you can do anything else, you need a list of the tasks to perform, from beginning the project to sweeping up the confetti at the end. This section describes how to build a list of individual tasks.
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 2) - The Project Window
Below the ribbon, most of the Project window is taken up with a view like the Gantt Chart, the Timeline, or the Resource Sheet. Some views, like the Resource Sheet, are like a giant table, but most views have a left and right side.
Taking Microsoft Project 2010 for a Test Drive (part 1) - Navigating the Project Ribbon
The Project ribbon is like a cyber-border collie, herding related features onto tabs to make them easier to find. As you plan and manage a project, you shift your focus from tasks to the resources who work on them to the big picture of the entire project, so the Task tab, Resource tab, and Project tab make perfect sense.
Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Preparing a Slide Show - Using Specialized Animations
Using specialized animations, you can quickly apply animations specific to certain objects using the Animations tab (New!). For example, for a text object, you can introduce the text on your slide all at once or by word or letter.
Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Preparing a Slide Show - Adding and Removing Animation
You can use animation to introduce objects onto a slide one at a time or with special animation effects. For example, a bulleted list can appear one bulleted item at a time, or a picture or chart can fade in gradually.
Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Preparing a Slide Show - Creating Slide Transitions
If you want to give your presentation more visual interest, you can add transitions between slides. For example, you can create a fading out effect so that one slide fades out as it is replaced by a new slide, or you can have one slide appear to push another slide out of the way.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Laying Out Shapes (part 3) - Fine-tuning Layout
The Re-layout button gives you quick access to several preconfigured layout styles. However, you can fine-tune the results by digging into three different dialogs, full of layout and connector settings just waiting to bewilder you.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Laying Out Shapes (part 2) - Using Visio’s Layout Features - Experimenting with Layout
The connectors are drawn over the network equipment, so send them all to back. The network shapes have connection points on each side, plus one in the middle.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Laying Out Shapes (part 1) - Using Visio’s Layout Features
Layout refers to the arrangement of shapes in a connected diagram. If you think about the way flowcharts, org charts, and network diagrams are typically laid out, you notice a difference in style that helps with the meaning and organization of each diagram type.
Developing, Integrating, and Building Applications in Sharepoint 2013 (part 3) - User Interface Integration - Ribbon and Action Menus
The ribbon was first introduced in SharePoint 2010 and provides the central location for all actions that a user may want to take on documents and other data. In SharePoint 2010, developers could include custom actions for their applications in the ribbon; SharePoint applications also allow this customization.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Annotating Shapes with Callouts
In previous versions of Visio, you could add a callout to a page from the Callouts stencil in the Visio Extras group. The Callouts stencil still exists: in the Shapes window, click More Shapes, click Visio Extras, and then click Callouts to see more than three dozen callout types. The following graphic shows one example.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding Containers and Lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes
Software designers use wireframe shapes to create mockups of dialog boxes and other visual elements that will be displayed by their applications. When you use Visio 2010 to create a mockup of a dialog box, you will find that the Dialog Form shape is a container.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding Containers and Lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
The Visio 2010 swimlane add-in was completely redesigned to take advantage of both lists and containers, with the net effect that a cross-functional flowchart (CFF) is a “list of containers”!
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding Shapes to Lists
A list is a special type of container that maintains its members in ordered sequence. When you drop an object into a list, it takes a specific place before, between, or after existing members. Each list member knows its relative position in the list.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting Containers, Sizing Containers
The predesigned containers in Visio 2010 expand automatically when you add shapes near the edge of the container. You can change the default behavior on the Format contextual tab of the Container Tools contextual tab set: in the Size group, click the Automatic Resize button to see three mutually exclusive options.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Working with Containers and Their Contents
Group shapes are still valuable for many purposes but Visio 2010 containers offer numerous advantages for grouping, moving, and managing a set of related shapes.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Comparing Containers and Groups
You can use either groups or containers to visually connect a set of shapes. However, the two have key behavioral differences that are likely to lead you to use one or the other depending on your needs.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Aligning and Arranging Shapes (part 7) - Controlling Front-to-Back Positioning
Note that when you group shapes together, you effectively create a new shape (the group), which ends up on top. Even if all the group’s members were behind other shapes to start, they end up on top.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Aligning and Arranging Shapes (part 6) - Using the Grid, Ruler, and Guides
Visio has a few other elements that are useful for keeping diagrams straight and orderly. The grid, ruler, and guides have been around since the first release of Visio and are starting to be considered old-fashioned.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Aligning and Arranging Shapes (part 5) - Aligning and Distributing Shapes Using Position Functions - Distributing Shapes, Rotating Shapes
If you need a set of shapes to be equally spaced, the distribute functions can help. You find them in the Space Shapes group within the Position drop-down. For veteran PC users, “space” seems to be the Visio 2010 verb for what used to be called “distribute.”
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Aligning and Arranging Shapes (part 4) - Aligning and Distributing Shapes Using Position Functions - Practice Aligning Shapes
Just to the right of the Auto Align & Space button is the Position drop-down button, which contains elemental functions for aligning, distributing, rotating, and flipping shapes. Figure 8 shows all of Position’s items and subitems.
Microsoft Visio 2010 : Aligning and Arranging Shapes (part 3) - Using Auto Align & Space to Clean Up Connected Diagrams
If you have been furiously flowcharting away, rapidly rearranging process steps and not paying attention to the Dynamic Grid, you might find yourself with a rather disheveled flowchart.
 
 
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- Microsoft Project 2010 : Maintaining Baselines (part 2) - Rolling-Wave Planning with Baselines
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- Windows 7 : Encrypting File System (part 1) - How to Encrypt a Folder with EFS, How to Create and Back Up EFS Certificates
- Sharepoint 2013 : Managing and Configuring My Sites (part 4) - SkyDrive Pro
- Windows 8 : Creating a Windows Network - Installing Network Wiring (part 3) - Connecting Just Two Computers, Connecting Multiple Switches
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Preparing a Slide Show - Adding and Removing Animation
- Architecting an Enterprise-Level Exchange Server 2013 Environment (part 2) - Designing Exchange Server Roles in an Exchange Server Environment
- Understanding Core Exchange Server 2013 Design Plans (part 4) - Determining Exchange Server 2013 Placement
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating an Index (part 1) - Adding an Index to a Document - Marking an Index Entry
 
 
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- Adobe Illustrator CS5 : Working with Paths (part 3) - Understanding how fills and strokes relate to paths
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